Canterbury Christ Church University

OVERVIEW

Canterbury Christ Church University (CCCU) was founded by the Church of England as a college for teaching training in 1962. It achieved public university status in 2005, but remains affiliated to the Anglican faith. The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, the head of the Church, is the institution’s vice chancellor.

The university has one campus in Canterbury, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and others spread out across the English county of Kent in Broadstairs, Folkestone, Medway and Tunbridge Wells.

There remains a strong focus on vocational training at CCCU, with courses for teachers, nurses, emergency service practitioners as well as those working in social care. However, it also offers a range of academic programmes across the arts, humanities, social sciences, business, science and engineering.

The university is currently being updated as part of a £150 million investment programme. A new arts building was completed in September 2016, which will be followed in 2020 by a new home for courses in science, engineering, technology and health. In 2014, the university acquired Canterbury’s 19th century prison, which is in the process of being renovated to extend the city’s campus by five acres.

The motto for CCCU is “The truth will set you free”, taken from John’s Gospel in the Christian new testament.

Student life in Canterbury is undoubtedly picturesque, filled with medieval architecture and gardens. Fans of old fashioned English pubs are well catered for and the city’s history is easily accessible through the Canterbury Heritage Museum.

The university has 60 different clubs and societies that students can take part in. Graduation ceremonies take place at both Canterbury and Rochester Cathedral, providing a stunning backdrop for the students’ big day.

No. of students per staff

Percentage of International Students

18.7%
12%

Student Ratio of Females to Males

67%
33%

Planned Developments at the Canterbury Campus

Following the university’s purchase of the former Canterbury Prison site in April 2014, the university undertook a review of its entire estate to ensure that it was able to meet the university’s strategic and academic vision.

In April 2017 Canterbury City Council approved the university’s plans for a new arts building on the North Holmes Campus. From January 2019 the new building offers students state-of-the-art learning space and technology.

Plans for a new building for science, engineering, technology and health were approved in December 2017. The building project was awarded over £6m of government funding along with £7m of funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England. The new building is due to open in 2020 and will be home to the university’s Kent and Medway Engineering, Design, Growth and Enterprise (EDGE) Hub and new courses in Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Product Design and Software Engineering. It will also provide teaching space for the new Kent and Medway Medical School – a joint initiative with the University of Kent. The medical school is also due to open in 2020.